Summary of Maslow on Self-Transcendence

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It is quite true that [we live] by bread alone—when there is no bread. But what happens to [our] desires when there is plenty of bread and when [our bellies are] chronically filled?
~ Abraham Maslow

(This article was reprinted in the online magazine of the Institute for Ethics & Emerging Technologies, February 4, 2017.)

The Hierarchy of Needs

Abraham Maslow (1908 – 1970) was an American psychologist best known for creating a theory of psychological health known as Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Textbooks usually portray Maslow’s hierarchy in the shape of a pyramid with our most basic needs at the bottom, and the need for self-actualization at the top.[1] Note how the iconic pyramid ignores self-transcendance:

The basic idea of the above image is that survival demands food, water, safety, shelter, etc. Then, to continue to develop, you need your psychological needs for belonging and love met by friends and family, as well as a sense of self-esteem that comes with some competence and success. If you have had these needs fulfilled, then you can explore the cognitive level of ideas, the aesthetic level of beauty and, as a result, you may experience the self-actualization that accompanies achieving your full potential.

Note that the higher needs don’t appear until lower needs are satisfied; so if you are hungry and cold, you can’t worry much about self-esteem, art, or mathematics. Notice also that the different levels correspond roughly to different stages of life. The needs of the bottom of the pyramid are predominant in infancy and early childhood; the needs for belonging and self-esteem predominate in later childhood and early adulthood; and the desire for self-actualization emerges with mature adulthood.

Self-Transcendence 

What is less well-known is that Maslow amended his model near the end of his life, and so the conventional portrayal of his hierarchy is incomplete. In his later thinking he argued that there is another, higher level of development, what he called self-transcendence. We achieve this level by focusing on goals beyond the self like altruism, spiritual awakening, liberation from egocentricity, and ultimately the unity of being. Here is how he put it:

Transcendence refers to the very highest and most inclusive or holistic levels of human consciousness, behaving and relating, as ends rather than means, to oneself, to significant others, to human beings in general, to other species, to nature, and to the cosmos. (The Farther Reaches of Human Nature, New York, 1971, p. 269.)

Notice that placing self-transcendence above self-actualization results in a radically different model. While self-actualization refers to fulfilling your own potential, self-transcendence refers literally to transcending the self. And if successful, self-trancenders often have what Maslow called peak experiences, in which they transcend the individual ego. In such mystical, aesthetic, or emotional states one feels intense joy, peace, well-being, and an awareness of ultimate truth and the unity of all things.

Maslow also believed that such states aren’t always transitory—some people might be able to readily access them. This led him to define another term, “plateau experience.” These are more lasting, serene cognitive states, as opposed to peak experiences which tend to be mostly emotional and temporary. Moreover, in plateau experiences one feels not only ecstasy, but the sadness that comes with realizing that others don’t have such experiences. While Maslow believed that self-actualized, mature people are those most likely to have these self-transcendent experiences, he also felt that everyone was potentially capable of having them.

Given that Maslow’s humanistic psychology emphasized self-actualization and what is right with people, it isn’t surprising that his later transpersonal psychology explored extreme wellness or optimal well-being. This took the form of interest in persons who have expanded their normal sense of identity to experience the transpersonal, or the underlying unity of all reality. (Thus the connection between transpersonal psychology, and the mystical and meditative traditions of many of the world’s religions.)

Let me conclude by looking at two succinct and eloquent statements contrasting self-actualization and self-transcendence. The first is from Mark Koltko-Rivera’s excellent summary of the Maslow’s later thought in: “Rediscovering the Later Version of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: Self-Transcendence and Opportunities for Theory, Research, and Unification.” Koltko-Rivera says:

At the level of self-actualization, the individual works to actualize the individual’s own potential [whereas] at the level of transcendence, the individual’s own needs are put aside, to a great extent, in favor of service to others …

The second is from Victor Frankl. (I written on Frankl previously in: “Summary of Mans’ Search For Meaning” and “Summary of Frankl on Tragic Optimism.”) In Man’s Search for Meaning, one of the most profound books ever written, Frankl writes:

… the real aim of human existence cannot be found in what is called self-actualization. Human existence is essentially self-transcendence rather than self-actualization. Self-actualization is not a possible aim at all; for the simple reason that the more a [person] would strive for it, the more [they] would miss it. For only to the extent to which [people] commit [themselves] to the fulfillment of [their] life’s meaning, to this extent [they] also actualize [themselves.] In other words, self-actualization cannot be attained if it is made an end in itself, but only as a side-effect of self-transcendence.

This lines up almost perfectly with what I think Maslow had in mind.

Reflections

I like the idea of going beyond self-actualization or fulfillment of personal potential to furthering causes beyond the self, or to experiencing communion with something beyond the self through peak and/or plateau experiences. I am receptive to these ideas as long as they derive from human or transhuman concerns without reference to a supernatural (and likely imaginary) realm. I can accept mysticism if that means that some things are mysterious, but I reject it if it refers to anything supernatural.

What especially appeals to me is how Maslow’s later thinking about self-transcendence can be understood as prefiguring transhumanism. I doubt that Maslow consciously thought about it in this way, but clearly his questions about the limits of human development—and the possibility that there are few limits–foreshadows transhumanist thinking. As Maslow said: “Human history is a record of the ways in which human nature has been sold short. The highest possibilities of human nature have practically always been underrated.” Perhaps we need meditation, altruism, communion with nature, and technologically-aided human enhancement through technology to best transcend ourselves.

(The relationship between transcendence and age is discussed in this post on gerotranscendence.)

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Addendum: Excerpts from “Theory Z” (re-printed in: The Farther Reaches of Human Nature)

1. For transcenders, peak experiences and plateau experiences become the most important things in their lives….

2. They speak more easily, normally, naturally, and unconsciously the language of Being (B-language), the language of poets, of mystics, of seers, of profoundly religious men…

3. They perceive unitively or sacrally (i.e., the sacred within the secular), or they see the sacredness in all things at the same time that they also see them at the practical, everyday D-level …

4. They are much more consciously and deliberately metamotivated. That is, the values of Being…, e.g., perfection, truth, beauty, goodness, unity, dichotomy-transcendence … are their main or most important motivations.

5. They seem somehow to recognize each other, and to come to almost instant intimacy and mutual understanding even upon first meeting…

6. They are more responsive to beauty. This may turn out to be rather a tendency to beautify all things… or to have aesthetic responses more easily than other people do…

7. They are more holistic about the world than are the “healthy” or practical self-actualizers… and such concepts as the “national interest” or “the religion of my fathers” or “different grades of people or of IQ” either cease to exist or are easily transcended…

8. [There is] a strengthening of the self-actualizer’s natural tendency to synergy—intrapsychic, interpersonal, intraculturally and internationally…. It is a transcendence of competitiveness, of zero-sum of win-lose gamesmanship.

9. Of course there is more and easier transcendence of the ego, the Self, the identity.

10. Not only are such people lovable as are all of the most self-actualizing people, but they are also more awe-inspiring, more “unearthly,” more godlike, more “saintly”…, more easily revered…

11. … The transcenders are far more apt to be innovators, discoverers of the new, than are the healthy self-actualizers… Transcendent experiences and illuminations bring clearer vision … of the ideal …of what ought to be, what actually could be, … and therefore of what might be brought to pass.

12. I have a vague impression that the transcenders are less “happy” than the healthy ones. They can be more ecstatic, more rapturous, and experience greater heights of “happiness” (a too weak word) than the happy and healthy ones. But I sometimes get the impression that they are as prone and maybe more prone to a kind of cosmic sadness … over the stupidity of people, their self-defeat, their blindness, their cruelty to each other, their shortsightedness… Perhaps this is a price these people have to pay for their direct seeing of the beauty of the world, of the saintly possibilities in human nature, of the non-necessity of so much of human evil, of the seemingly obvious necessities for a good world…

13. The deep conflicts over the “elitism” that is inherent in any doctrine of self-actualization—they are after all superior people whenever comparisons are made—is more easily solved—or at least managed—by the transcenders than by the merely healthy self-actualizers. This is made possible because they … can sacralize everybody so much more easily. This sacredness of every person and even of every living thing, even of nonliving things … is so easily and directly perceived in its reality by every transcender …

14. My strong impression is that transcenders show more strongly a positive correlation—rather than the more usual inverse one—between increasing knowledge and increasing mystery and awe… For peak-experiencers and transcenders in particular, as well as for self-actualizers in general, mystery is attractive and challenging rather than frightening … I affirm … that at the highest levels of development of humanness, knowledge is positively, rather than negatively, correlated with a sense of mystery, awe, humility, ultimate ignorance, reverence …

15. Transcenders, I think, should be less afraid of “nuts” and “kooks” than are other self-actualizers, and thus are more likely to be good selectors of creators  … To value a William Blake type takes, in principle, a greater experience with transcendence and therefore a greater valuation of it…

16. …Transcenders should be more “reconciled with evil” in the sense of understanding its occasional inevitability and necessity in the larger holistic sense, i.e., “from above,” in a godlike or Olympian sense. Since this implies a better understanding of it, it should generate both a greater compassion with it and a less ambivalent and a more unyielding fight against it….

17. … Transcenders … are more apt to regard themselves as carriers of talent, instruments of the transpersonal, temporary custodians so to speak of a greater intelligence or skill or leadership or efficiency. This means a certain peculiar kind of objectivity or detachment toward themselves that to nontranscenders might sound like arrogance, grandiosity or even paranoia…. Transcendence brings with it the “transpersonal” loss of ego.

18. Transcenders are in principle (I have no data) more apt to be profoundly “religious” or “spiritual” in either the theistic or nontheistic sense. Peak experiences and other transcendent experiences are in effect also to be seen as “religious or spiritual” experiences….

19. … Transcenders, I suspect, find it easier to transcend the ego, the self, the identity, to go beyond self-actualization. … Perhaps we could say that the description of the healthy ones is more exhausted by describing them primarily as strong identities, people who know who they are, where they are going, what they want, what they are good for, in a word, as strong Selves… And this of course does not sufficiently describe the transcenders. They are certainly this; but they are also more than this.

20. I would suppose… that transcenders, because of their easier perception of the B-realm, would have more end experiences (of suchness) than their more practical brothers do, more of the fascinations that we see in children who get hypnotized by the colors in a puddle, or by the raindrops dripping down a windowpane, or by the smoothness of skin, or the movements of a caterpillar.

21. In theory, transcenders should be somewhat more Taoistic, and the merely healthy somewhat more pragmatic.

22. …Total wholehearted and unconflicted love, acceptance … rather than the more usual mixture of love and hate that passes for “love” or friendship or sexuality or authority or power, etc.

23. [Transcenders are interested in a “cause beyond their own skin,” and are better able to “fuse work and play,” “they love their work,” and are more interested in “kinds of pay other than money pay”; “higher forms of pay and metapay steadily increase in importance.”] Mystics and transcenders have throughout history seemed spontaneously to prefer simplicity and to avoid luxury, privilege, honors, and possessions. …

24. I cannot resist expressing what is only a vague hunch; namely, the possibility that my transcenders seem to me somewhat more apt to be Sheldonian ectomorphs [lean, nerve-tissue dominated body-types] while my less-often-transcending self-actualizers seem more often to be mesomorphic [muscular body-types] (… it is in principle easily testable).

15 thoughts on “Summary of Maslow on Self-Transcendence

  1. I don’t know anything about philosophy, nor had I ever read Maslow, but several things about this post rang a bell for me. When I was still in high school, I decided that my purpose in life was to make the world a better place. In order to accomplish this, I knew that I had to take proper care of my body, providing it with resources adequate to insure that it would not be a distraction. Later I realized that I had to do the same with my mind; it has its needs, too. Once I saw my body and mind as instruments for bettering the world, life became much clearer. This seems somewhat akin to Maslow’s “self transcendence”.

    In my early years, all my energies had to be devoted to honing the tool: educating myself, building a happy relationship with my wife, earning a living, buying washing machines, etc. But with each passing year, I was able to devote more energy to the true purpose. I started off teaching. But then I shifted to designing computer games, and I had a clear purpose here: to develop games into an educational and artistic medium. Every one of my designs had an educational purpose, and I did not follow the path of other designers and keep grinding out sequels to make more money; I kept pushing the designs further. I pushed a little too far, and in my later career my stuff didn’t sell well, but I didn’t much care; those designs would inspire other designers, I hoped.

    Nowadays I devote almost all my energies to helping make the world a better place, but another process has developed as well. Living in the forest, I am close to nature, and my scientific orientation has permitted me to see reality as a tightly intertwined system. When I look at a tree, I do not see leaves, branches, trunk, bark, etc. I see minerals underground dissolving into water, then the water is absorbed by root hairs, carried up the cambium to the leaves, where it combines with sunlight and carbon dioxide to generate adenosine triphosphate, which drives much of the internal chemistry of the leaf cells. It also makes sugars that are passed to other cells to fuel the growth of the tree. It all works together. I no longer see the universe as a collection of things; to me, it’s a system of processes.

    I suppose that this is the nerd’s version of the Buddhist monk spreading his arms and praying “Make me one with everything!”

    I have never experienced these “peak experiences” or “plateau experiences” of which Maslow writes. Instead, I feel only a broad calmness, a confident serenity. Throughout the week-long ordeal with no power, no heat, no water, no communications, snowed in at my house earlier this month, I never felt sad or threatened or even put out — it was just the universe playing out its processes, and I was going along for the ride, guiding my unsinkable kayak through the raging waters with absolute certainty that I would be fine.

    This essay has given me much to think about. Thank you for it.

  2. Thanks for the wonderful comments. A couple of things. One Maslow talked about the encounter with nature as one of the main ways we experience transcendance. An two, your penultimate sentence sounds like it came off the pen of Alan Watts! Thanks again.

  3. Excellent essay, thank you. The connection to Victor Frankl was especially appropriate. I think we all hope to go beyond self-actualization, which seems to me to be an inwardly focused view of the world, toward transcendence, which seems outwardly focused. In fact, I would have preferred that Maslow had dropped the “self” from the term “self-transcendence” to emphasize that one is going beyond thinking of oneself toward thinking about the larger world that exists outside oneself.

  4. Great comment and great point. I’ll have to look again. This was the first time I encountered this material, but I think he did use the transcendence without the self. Or you can look at one of the links and let me know.

  5. John, I think your observation is correct. In my original comment, I had simply taken for granted that Maslow himself had called his thoughts on transcendence by the label “self-transcendence”. It never occurred to me that the label “self-transcendence” might have been coined by others trying to link Maslow’s later thoughts to his earlier pinnacle of “self-actualization”. When scanning through the references that your essay linked to, I got the impression that Maslow himself did not use the label “self-transcendence”. But only an exhaustive reading of his original texts could substantiate that.

    So how much does a label matter? Am I just nitpicking? Somehow I think that inclusion of the word “self” subtly changes the meaning that I think Maslow was trying to convey. Or maybe not. I’m no philosopher … or English major, for that matter!

  6. I think you are right that the label matters. Calling is self-transcendence still seems to emphasize a self that’s trying to transcend. In that case it sounds like the self might somehow remain after the transcending. Of course just saying transcendence doesn’t say what it is that’s being transcended.This raises deep metaphysical issues about ego transcendence. In general in Adviata Vedanta and similar thought there is only unity, ie. no distinction between self and the one reality. In western mysticism the self subtly remains union with the divine. Not knowing Maslow’s thought well, I can’t say what he meant.

  7. Huh, I automatically interpreted “self-transcendence” as the self being transcended (by the transcender, or perhaps one could say by human nature, the cosmos, or maybe even agentlessly, by nothing at all), rather than the self doing the transcending.

    Like Chris, I felt my mind resonating when I read this essay, especially the excerpts from “Theory Z”, which reminded me (in much more polished form) of the sort of metaphysical musings I’ve had ever since I was a teenager. In fact, when I was 17, I followed my own religion called “Transcendence”, which in its nuts and bolts had a similar trajectory to Maslow’s ideas. Before reading this, I hadn’t know that Maslow came up with a “self-transcendence” above “self-actualization”; this makes me like the pyramid a lot more! I clearly need to read ‘The Farther Reaches of Human Nature’.

    For the record, I seem to be a good ways off from self-transcendence myself. But there’s always still time!

  8. Your blog about Self Transcendence is mind blowing! One important connection is to the chronology of life. As suggested by Erik Erickson, people gain experience and wisdom as they grow older, reaching the age for generativity toward the end of life. Maslow’s mention of transcendence matches up with the work on Gerotranscendence from Lars Tornstam in Sweden.

  9. Hello, may I ask about this “Reflections” I really need your answers cuz it’s my report in our class … Can you explain to me what is it the main idea of this …

  10. I just reject any religious connotations regarding ST. And I think ST will ultimately be brought about by technology.

  11. I have never experienced these “peak experiences” or “plateau experiences” of which Maslow writes. Instead, I feel only a broad calmness, a confident serenity. Throughout the week-long ordeal with no power, no heat, no water, no communications, snowed in at my house earlier this month, I never felt sad or threatened or even put out

  12. It sounds like you have achieved inner peace Angelica. That is worth more than gold. Thanks for the comment. JGM

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