Monthly Archives: March 2021

Should We Argue?

Agreeable Burden (William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1895)

A previous post “On Belief and Skepticism,” elicited this response from a reader:

… I too am a dedicated skeptic, but find it difficult sometimes to “disagree without being disagreeable.” Many people I disagree with most fundamentally are the ones I love most profoundly. Do you maintain close relationships with people holding drastically different beliefs? It’s hard to separate the person from the ideas they hold especially when there is so much vested emotionally in those ideas. I hate the idea of “agreeing to disagree.” I’m not going to dance around the issue; We are adults and honesty is important. How do you approach these relationships? Continue reading Should We Argue?

Benatar: The Human Predicament: A Candid Guide to Life’s Biggest Questions. 

I have previously written about the philosopher David Benatar’s anti-natalism. Now Oxford University Press has published his new book The Human Predicament: A Candid Guide to Life’s Biggest Questions.  Here is a brief summary of the book followed by a few comments.

Continue reading Benatar: The Human Predicament: A Candid Guide to Life’s Biggest Questions. 

The Prisoner’s Dilemma and Climate Change

Global temperature anomalies for 2015 compared to the 1951–1980 baseline. 2015 was the warmest year in the NASA/NOAA temperature record, which starts in 1880. It has since been superseded by 2016.

The Science

To understand climate change you just need basic physics and mathematics. The physics works like this. The earth’s surface temperature is governed by the absorption and emission of thermal radiation, and greenhouse gases (GHG) like CO2 and CH4 (methane) trap thermal radiation making the earth’s surface warmer. The mathematics is even simpler. Continue reading The Prisoner’s Dilemma and Climate Change