Monthly Archives: December 2021

Anxiety and Depression from a Philosophical Viewpoint

[This post was written in response to a friend who feels guilty about their depression.]

Consider these two questions: 1) Are you responsible for being depressed or anxious? And 2) Should you feel guilty or ashamed of being depressed or anxious? Continue reading Anxiety and Depression from a Philosophical Viewpoint

“The Far Side of Despair” – Hazel Barnes

Hazel Barnes (1915-2008) was a longtime professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She played a major role in introducing French existentialism to the English-speaking world through her translations and scholarship. (She did one of the first English translations of Sartre’s Being and Nothingness.) Continue reading “The Far Side of Despair” – Hazel Barnes

Why The USA Desperately Needs Immigrants


A friend recently shared, “As We Live Longer, How Should Life Change? There Is a Blueprint.” The article investigates how we will have to reimagine education, careers, cities, and life transitions for lives that span a century (or more). I’d like to consider just one issue that arises in the article—the fact that the population in the USA  is aging and its birthrate continues to decline. Continue reading Why The USA Desperately Needs Immigrants

Philosophy Study Guides – by Professor Laurence Houlgate

Laurence Houlgate, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo CA.jpg

I recently discovered several superb, low-cost study guides on the classics of philosophy. They are authored by Laurence Houlgate, Ph.D., who is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy
at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo where he was a beloved colleague and teacher. He wrote the guides after his retirement in order to keep a promise to his former students. Continue reading Philosophy Study Guides – by Professor Laurence Houlgate

Do We Matter in the Cosmos?

NASA-HS201427a-HubbleUltraDeepField2014-20140603.jpg

The Hubble Ultra-Deep Field image shows some of the most remote galaxies visible with present technology, each consisting of billions of stars (the image’s area of sky is very small – equivalent in size to one-tenth of a full moon)[1]

Nick Hughes is a postdoctoral research fellow at University College Dublin. His essay, “Do we matter in the cosmos?” begins by placing humanity  in our true temporal and spatial perspective: Continue reading Do We Matter in the Cosmos?