Monthly Archives: December 2023

Americans turn to Stoicism in their search for meaning

Zeno of Citium, the founder of Stoicism

by ,  Arizona State University
(originally appeared in “The Conversation” Nov. 29, 2023)

Stoicism may be having a renaissance. For centuries, the ancient philosophy that originated in Greece and spread across the Roman Empire was more or less treated as extinct – with the word “stoic” hanging on as shorthand for someone unemotional. But today, with the help of the internet, it’s gaining ground: Continue reading Americans turn to Stoicism in their search for meaning

Blogging For Ten Years Old

Visualization of Internet routing pathsAn Opte Project visualization of routing paths through a portion of the Internet

I published my first post on this blog exactly ten years ago today. Since then I’ve published 1341 posts. However, I have reposted some old ones and had guest authors too so the number above exaggerates my productivity. Continue reading Blogging For Ten Years Old

Dropping An Atomic Bomb

A vast devastated area with only a few burned out buildings standingby Chris Crawford

First, I have a good friend who is a hibakusha (survivor of an atomic bombing). She was ten years old and reading a book a little more than a mile from ground zero when the bomb exploded at Hiroshima. She was only slightly injured, but she very nearly died of radiation exposure. I helped her rewrite her memoirs, and we spent many hours discussing the events. Continue reading Dropping An Atomic Bomb

Applying John Rawls’ Principles to the Israel-Hamas War

by Laurence Houlgate
(Emeritus professor of philosophy at California Polytechnic State University)

Part 1 – Preface

On August 6, 1945, the atomic bombing of Hiroshima instantly killed 80,000 Japanese people.  Tens of thousands more died of radiation exposure.  Continue reading Applying John Rawls’ Principles to the Israel-Hamas War