Category Archives: Book Reviews – Meaning of Life/Science

Existential Physics: A Scientists Guide To Life’s Biggest Questions

I just finished Sabine Hossenfelder’s new book, Existential Physics: A Scientists Guide To Life’s Biggest Questions. I intended to do a full review but alas don’t have the time. Still, I wanted to share a few notes I made on key points she made in each chapter. So here goes: Continue reading Existential Physics: A Scientists Guide To Life’s Biggest Questions

Review of Sabine Hossenfelder’s, “Existential Physics”

Sabine Hossenfelder is a German theoretical physicistscience communicator, author, musician and YouTuber. She is currently employed as a research fellow at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies. Her new book, Existential Physics: A Scientists Guide To Life’s Biggest Questions is outstanding. Continue reading Review of Sabine Hossenfelder’s, “Existential Physics”

Sean Carroll: The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe

I have just finished Sean Carroll’s The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself. Carroll is a theoretical physicist and philosopher who specializes in quantum mechanics, gravity, and cosmology. He is a prolific public speaker, science populariser, and an NSF Distinguished Lecturer. It’s one of the most enjoyable and thoughtful books I’ve read in a long time. Continue reading Sean Carroll: The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe

Review of “A Meaning to Life” by Michael Ruse

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Michael Ruse (1940 – ) is a philosopher of science who specializes in the philosophy of biology, the relationship between science and religion, the creation-evolution controversy, and the demarcation problem within science. Continue reading Review of “A Meaning to Life” by Michael Ruse

Review of Daniel Dennett’s, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea


A reader’s comment on one of my posts provided a good review of Daniel Dennett’s Darwin’s Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life. Here is Jim Roger’s review.

DARWIN’S DANGEROUS IDEA is one of those books that should be read slowly and savored – and then re-read again and again. It took me all summer to work my way through the book (I’m a slow reader), but it was a thoroughly enjoyable and thought-provoking experience. Dennett has sharpened my understanding of Darwinian evolution from a vague concept that I learned many years ago in school to a much richer perspective. Continue reading Review of Daniel Dennett’s, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea